Miss Universe semi-finalists for 1968 (via)

Anonymous asked: Not being rude but why do you go on about women all the time? Why are you a feminist? It's 2014... You can vote and work and wear trousers.

catscratch-fever:

Short answer: Because I’m woman.

Long answer:

Because misogyny is real and can be fatal.
Because it’s common for people to question every inch of a woman’s life when she reports a rape or sexual assault (what were you wearing? how much did you drink? was it dark out? were you alone? did you know the guy liked you? why didn’t you go home? did you not say no?)
Because in many countries, women are forced to marry their rapist, carry their baby, live a life of non-consensual sex.
Because people ask if my boyfriend minds that I earn more than him.
Because women who have kids and work are called bad mothers and women who have kids and stay at home are lazy or benefit scroungers.
Because when I go out to bars I frequently get touched inappropriately and laughed at when I protest.
Because I can’t walk alone in the dark without fearing for my safety and knowing I’m not being irrational.
Because I get asked “do you actually like Star Wars or are you just into it to look cool?”
Because ‘girl’ and ‘weakness’ are synonymous to so many people.
Because if I like sex, I’m a slut, and if I don’t, I’m a prude.
Because when I grew out my body hair, people gave me dirty looks and made nasty comments.
Because so many jokes involve misogyny, tired stereotypes, and a complete lack of respect for women and girls.
Because jobs that are traditionally seen as “women’s work” are paid much less (childcare, cleaning, catering).
Because there is a pay gap between men and women (in the UK, women earn on average £5k less).
Because when I’m assertive, I’m a bitch. A man is just assertive.
Because when I’m emotional I’m PMSing, I’m irrational, I’m hysterical. A man is passionate.
Because when women are victims of domestic violence people say, ‘if they stay, they deserve it’.
Because a man being called a girl is supposed to be an insult.
Because men get attacked for dressing like women.
Because I read an article today about teenage mothers and how they “lack self-respect”.
Because I know people who have been fired for taking time off after a miscarriage.
Because going on maternity leave can cost you your job.
Because every time I tag a post on here with ‘feminism’, a man reblogs it and tries to tear it apart.
Because in many countries girls do not have the same access to education that boys do.
Because I get compliments that end with “… For a girl” (I can run fast for a girl, I can punch hard for a girl, I’m smart for a girl…)
Because the way the media portray women is hugely skewed from reality.
Because women are expected to shave and wax and exfoliate and put on make up and dye their hair and style their hair and never look tired or old or fat and smell like a fresh garden of flowers and smile and giggle.
Because a fat woman is disgusting but a fat man enjoys his food.
Because I should be happy with being able to vote and work and wear trousers and ignore the inequality I experience in my life and that occurs the world over.

Because this list is never ending.
Because feminism is a dirty word.

Because women do not have the same right and privileges available to them as men.


And because I continue to get questions like this.

Good news: The trailers are way more offensive and annoying than the show itself (especially this trailer, which I hate with the fury of a thousand suns). The story, which follows best friends Amy and Karma who take being mistaken for a lesbian couple at an ultra-liberal high school as a golden opportunity to improve their social standing, isn’t about two fake lesbians; it’s about one fake lesbian and one very confused best friend who is probably an actual lesbian. In fact, it’s the fake relationship that enables Amy’s gradual revelation of her own Sapphic leanings, and it happens in a way that a lot of queer women can relate to. You know, the whole “falling in love with your best friend” thing.

MTV’s “Faking It” Is Pretty Good, For Real | Autostraddle

MTV’s “Faking It,” about two high school girls pretending to be in a lesbian relationship to gain popularity, premieres tonight at 10:30 Eastern on MTV. Autostraddle’s Riese Bernard actually really liked it. Let’s see what everyone else thinks tonight! 

Okay so as a queer person who found out they were queer by falling in love with their best friend in a very painful and dramatic journey of unrequited love and multiple love triangles (that also made them realize they were polyamorous) I totally identify with the falling in love with the best friend thing which is cool but this is a hella problematic way to go about doing that considering the hell that being both in and out of the closet during school put my friends and I in and the amount of times I and other queer friends were told we were “just faking it”

(via fuckyeahsexeducation)

betterthandarkchocolate:

thelipstickontherim:

Bring socks!!!! #homeless #donate #homelessness

As are toiletries!

Girls are raised in a society where flattering clothing means clothing that makes you look skinnier. Where fat is an insult more often than a noun and not just a physical description but a reflection of personality. Where “you look healthy” is what you say when a girl gains weight, but “you look good” is what you say when a girl loses weight. Girls are raised in a society that teaches them it is their own responsibility to be as small as possible because they do not deserve to take up space.

— Anonymous   (via pestan)
grace-morgan-art:

grace-morgan-art:

Guys, just be cool.
Art by Grace Kettenbrink

I’m just bringing this back because its gotten such amazing feedback! Thank you all so much!
obeytheprophecy:

▲ obey the prophecy ▲ the door to wonderland

Lily Rabe as Misty Day in American Horror Story: Coven

goalzzzzzz

bikinipowerbottom:

"She’s really pretty for a black girl"

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“He’s really cool for a gay guy”

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“She’s doing really well for a woman”

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To me, fat liberation is understanding that is it not my fat body that has failed; it is the culture that has failed for oppressing this body. To me, fat liberation is knowing that my body is not wrong because it is fat; it is the culture that is wrong for discriminating against and stigmatizing my body.

— “Fat Liberation is…" by Virgie Tovar (via fat-grrrl-activism)